Baby Driver

This is going to be a short review because I don’t have much to say about Baby Driver that isn’t positive. I knew that the combination of this movie’s premise with Edgar Wright as the director would most likely result in an experience of profound joy. As someone who considers their first viewing of Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive to be one of the closest things to a religious experience that they’ve ever had, I am already on-board with well-made movies about quirky getaway drivers that like listening to music while they work. But the level at which Wright integrates the music into this movie was something I was truly unprepared for.

Scott Pilgrim vs. the World demonstrated Wright’s ability to handle musical moments with both songs and fight sequences, but what Baby Driver does isn’t just a rehash of that movie’s technique. The lead character, “Baby”, picks specific songs to drive/work/escape to during heists. And when those songs start, everything, and I mean EVERYTHING that’s happening in the movie is following the trajectory of the song. Every gunshot, every car movement, every background noise. In Baby Driver, the characters don’t burst into song, the world of the movie does. And it is done with just the right balance of cool and ridiculous, and so seamlessly that it never once becomes annoying or overwhelming.

Part of the reason this works so well is Ansel Elgort’s performance as “Baby”. Elgort’s many moments throughout the film where he joyfully sings and dances along to the music that he loves and needs so much instantly win you over from the very first scene. His sweet romance with Lily James’ character, Debora, is highlighted by him performing songs centered on her name in front of his deaf foster father, Joseph (played by CJ Jones), and their first date in a laundromat, where the camera swirls around them like a dance sequence. Their chemistry is charming, and easily sells a romance centered around two people that just want to escape their respective jobs.

All of the supporting turns from Spacey, Hamm, González, and Foxx are equally fun and menacing, providing further balance to Baby Driver‘s tone. These characters are both exactly what you expect and very surprising in certain scenes.

I have missed Edgar Wright so very much, and I am very happy that he is back with a movie as joyful, musical, and exciting as this.

Advertisements

A Surprisingly Fun But Frustrating Mess: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

I used to be a big Harry Potter fan. I was gifted the first book by both my aunt and grandma when I was 6, and some of the few happy memories that I have of my family pre-divorce are of my dad reading the first three books to me. Together with the film adaptations being released every few years, I was in love with this universe. At least until 2007. After the books finished, my enthusiasm for the series waned. The story was over, and I found that I didn’t like David Yates’ entries in the film series.

So when Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them was announced, I was completely apathetic to its existence. David Yates was back to direct a Harry Potter prequel that Warner Brothers wanted to become a series. OK, whatever. When the first trailer was in front of a number of movies I saw in theaters, I had the same reaction.

Even the reveal that Grindelwald and Dumbledore would eventually be characters in the series didn’t elicit any interest. As for Johnny Depp’s casting… I’ll get to that in a bit.

When I did go to see Fantastic Beasts, I had heard good things from a couple friends and early reviews. So I managed to have a little curiosity by the time the movie started.

Continue reading

Star Trek Beyond: I Really Wanted to Like This Movie

I’m seriously surprised at how much I didn’t like Star Trek Beyond. As of this writing, I’ve made my way through two-thirds of The Original Series, in addition to two seasons of The Next Generation and all-but-two of the Trek films. I make no claim to be a hardcore or lifelong fan of this franchise/universe, but I love it very much.

Which is why I’m wondering if I saw a different movie than everyone else who has reviewed Star Trek Beyond and sung its praises.

Continue reading

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice – Can We Have Our Heroes Back Now?

Let’s get this first part out of the way: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice is an objectively bad movie. Its characters are woefully underdeveloped, with unclear motivation at every turn. The editing is some of the worst ever done for a big-budget Hollywood production. And there are so many dream sequences in this movie, without any attempt at transition or clarification, that at a certain point I resigned myself to not knowing what the reality of this movie would be for the remainder of its running time.

There’s also the Martha scene.

I’m just not touching that. It’s an embarrassment of bad storytelling. Others have dealt with that scene, and its stupidity. I won’t, because I am incapable of giving that scene more attention than it has already received.

Still with me? All right, let’s get to what is really wrong with this movie. And Zack Snyder as a superhero filmmaker.

Continue reading